we have blood on our hands

a meditation for 09/11/2018

scripture

Old Testament Reading: Lamentations 3:22-51

Reading from the Psalms: Psalm 51: 1-6, 10-12, 15-19

New Testament Reading: Romans 12:9-21

prayer

Let the words of my mouth and the meditations of all our hearts be pleasing to you, oh God, our Rock and our Redeemer.

on that day

I had just finished teaching my first class of the day — eighth grade math — and wandered next door to say good morning to Laurie, my colleague and the history and 7th grade homeroom teacher at the tiny Catholic school where we worked. She was on the phone, which was unusual for that time of day, and suddenly clambered around desks and over a table to turn the television on. A skyscraper was on fire. Before either of us could process what was going on, an airplane crashed into an adjacent building. You’ve all probably seen the footage by now: smoke, flames, mangled steel; and perhaps the muscle memory in your abdomen can summon the clench and the nausea and the horrified disbelief that clawed on our spirits when the towers collapsed on themselves, burying thousands of victims.

It wasn’t just New York, of course, there was a plane that crashed through a wall of the Pentagon, and another headed that way which was diverted by its brave passengers, and crashed in a field in Pennsylvania. My brother had been scheduled to work in the Pentagon that day, but like so many others, something prevented him from arriving at his destination in a timely fashion. It was a very long day waiting to hear the news that, no, he wasn’t there, and yes, he was safe.

Our Romans scripture says “Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all. Beloved, never avenge yourselves, but leave room for the wrath of God.”

What happened on September 11, 2001, was tragic, but let us create space for the thought that the events that led up to the terrorist response and and things that happened as a result of September 11 are equally as tragic and painful to God.

****

One of the questions that was voiced frequently in the time following the attack on the Twin Towers and the Pentagon was, “Why would anyone do this to us?” I admit that back in 2001, I didn’t know the answer to that question. It was about five years ago that I began to learn about the way United States foreign policy, and overt actions from our government impacted the Middle East and surrounding areas, and realized that the bed we have made for ourselves as a nation is a dangerous one with blood-stained sheets.

And it’s not just the United States that has been violent and othering. Christianity itself adopted the sword as its venerated symbol when Constantine had his miraculous vision the night before the Battle of Milvian Bridge. Slash and burn doesn’t sound much like “Vengeance is mine, says the Lord.”

Pastor Brian McClaren was quoted in a book we read for Kairos class. He said,

“Instead of a gold-plated, bejeweled spear-cross with the words “Threaten and kill by this,” imagine that Constantine had seen a vision of a basin and a towel with the words, “Serve by this,” or a vision of a simple table of bread and wine with “Reconcile by this,” or a vision of Christ’s outstretched arms with “Embrace by this,” or a vision of the birds of the air and the flowers of the field with “Trust like this,” or a vision of a mother hen gathering her chicks with “Love like this,” or a vision of a dove descending from heaven with the words, “Be as kind as this.” But it was not so.”

It was not so.

blood on our hands

In this country, it has always been more important to own land than it has been to give to the least of these. It was more important to be capitalist than it was to free the enslaved.   It was more important for white women to get the vote than it was to get the Civil Rights Act passed. It is more important to be a patriot than it is to closely read history and think critically about how the United States has engaged the world.

It was more important to hang our flag on the oil rigs out in the Iraqi desert than it was to take the time to learn that the country the West named Iraq was really composed of three distinct people groups who did not all reside within the border we drew due to their nomadic culture.

In this country it was more important to one-up the Soviet Union in Afghanistan by enlisting the help of a Saudi businessman than it was to embrace or reconcile. It was more important to cast aside the Afghani people, Afghanistan, the mujahideen, and the businessman and pursue better opportunities than it was to make a legitimate effort to stabilize the area. It was more important to fuel the war machines than it was to cultivate peace.

Allan Aubrey Boesak tagged a thought to McClaren’s:

Indeed, I would add just one thing. Imagine that Constantine, having seen all of the above, had a vision of Jesus on the cross, overcoming the power of violence and domination and death with the power and of love and servanthood and sacrifice, with the words, ‘Resist by this.’

The United States of America has blood on its hands. We most certainly have the blood of our own people on our own hands. This blood is the blood of Native people, of the enslaved. It is the blood of the British, the French, the Germans, the Dutch, the Russians, the Lebanese, the Saudis, the Iraqis, the citizens of Iran, the Armenians, the Kurds, the Palestinians, the Syrians, the Yemeni, the Yazidis. And that is not a complete list. According to the Googles, there are 195 countries in the world today, and I think we would be hard pressed to name one that we haven’t soiled, directly or indirectly.

 Resist by this.Image result for picture of a person standing with arms extended out to the side

wounded christ

In his book Exclusion and Embrace, scholar Miroslav Volf talks about the way Paul died to his own self, and centered his life on Christ. Volf says, “the self is never without a center; it is always engaged in the production of its own center.” Volf suggests that the self becomes de-centered and re-centered by becoming nailed to the cross in an act of becoming united with Christ. The pain of the nail drives out the attentions, desires, and relationships of the flesh while simultaneously tethering us to Christ. When our lives are constantly being re-centered on Christ, we are making a conscious decision to step back from the world and into unity with Christ.

There is a remarkable essay by Frederick Bauerschmidt called “The Wounds of Christ.” Bauerschmidt says that there is a wound at the very center of creation. The wound of God was created when God renounced being everything in order to create light and dark and land and sea and space out of Godself. Creation is defined by presence, and the wound is the place from which life flows out. He calls this wound “the free place of possibility” because nothing is present in the wound, but anything and everything can happen because of it. The presence of creation tries hard to bandage the wound, to heal it, but applying presence to absence is not a strategy that works. We are creation, and because we flow out of the wound of possibility, we are indeed co-creators in this present world. In our presentness and with our presence, we create other wounds.

Crucifixion was the worst possible death for the worst possible criminal. It was so degrading and horror-filled, that some did not dare to speak of it. But it is critically important to remember that the suffering of the powerless and the enslaved in the moment of that violent death is “a sacrament which bears witness to that form and makes it present.”

Bauerschmidt asks, “What, then, was this wound of Jesus?” How do we understand and respond if the particular wounds of Jesus are so violent, so unthinkable, and so unspeakable?  Mother Julian answers:

With a kindly countenance our good Lord looked into his side, and he gazed with joy, and with his sweet regard he drew his creature’s understanding into his side by the same wound; and there he revealed a fair and delectable place, large enough for all humankind that will be saved and will rest in peace and love. And with that he brought to mind the dear and precious blood and water which he suffered to be shed for love. And in this sweet sight he showed his blessed heart split in two, and as he rejoiced he showed my understanding a part of his blessed divinity, as much as was his will at that time, strengthening my poor soul to understand what can be said, that is the endless love which was without beginning and is and always shall be.

The wound is the blessed, sacred heart of Jesus, split in two, out of which endless love flows. And it is by this wound, and with this sacred, cleansing blood that we are able to once and for all remove these damn spots from our hands and our souls.

It is only by re-centering ourselves by being nailed to the Cross like Jesus that we will be able to begin to transform the world in which justice and injustice, goodness and evil, innocence and guilt, purity and corruption, truth and deception crisscross and intersect. It is only by re-centering ourselves that we can begin to be guided by the recognition that the economy of underserved grace has primacy of the economy of moral deserts. 

When we resist like this *ARMS OUT*, the work of reconciliation should proceed under the assumption that, though the behavior of a person may be judged as deplorable, or even demonic, no one should ever be excluded from the will to embrace, because at the deepest level, the relationship to others does not rest on their moral performance and therefore cannot be undone by the lack of it.

When we become crucified with Christ and re-centered, and when we place our hands in the wounds of Christ, and truly begin to live to God and with God and by God and through God, we create space to lament what has come before, and to plot a new course in history where we actively live the Gospel of Christ: loving our neighbors, standing with the oppressed, and becoming the living embodiment of God’s justice and mercy.


Amen.

But why the wilderness?

(There's a link at the bottom of the post to an mp3 of this sermon.)

Hear ye, hear ye! “The beginning of the good news of Jesus Christ, the Son of God.” What’s this about good news? The author of the Gospel of Mark sure did know how to grab his listener’s attention. Not all the other gospel authors penned such an auspicious beginning to their version of the story.  Matthew opens up with seventeen verses of genealogy. There are a whole bunch of people who are really into genealogy, but still — that’s almost a whole Bible page of begetting. Luke starts by saying, “Look.  I know everybody and their brother has written about the life of Jesus. But. You just gotta hear this one.” And John’s gospel begins by dissecting Trinitarian theology. It’s not light reading. But Mark draws you in… his gospel is the very first account of the beginning of the good news of Jesus. Picture the listeners on the edge of their seats, leaning in with wide eyes. Tell me about this good news!

But does Mark talk about Jesus right away? Does he give the people what they want? He does not. The beginning of the good news of Jesus doesn’t start at Jesus’ conception, or  earlier when the angel came to Mary, or even earlier than that when Zechariah and Elizabeth heard the good news about their shocking pregnancy. It isn’t good storytelling to get to the good stuff straight away. No, Mark takes his listeners down memory lane and revisits the book of Isaiah, which says,  “See, I am sending my messenger ahead of you, who will prepare your way; the voice of one crying out in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight,’”

Mark’s Jewish listeners would definitely recognize these verses. After all, they had been relying on verses like these that promised their Messiah was coming for thousands and thousands of years. It’s possible that some of the listeners were alive back when Jesus was doing ministry, and when he was crucified, and they might remember hearing the assertions that Jesus really was the Messiah, the Son of God.

A voice in the wilderness

So who was this voice in the wilderness? And what was he doing all the way out there? In the book of Isaiah, the voice belongs to a mystery prophet. He’s not identified, and it seems that the prophet’s purpose is to assure the people of Israel that God has plans to restore Zion, and to provide for them. But Mark is different. Mark knows the prophet is John the Baptist. Mark 1.4 says “John the baptizer appeared in the wilderness proclaiming repentance and forgiveness of sins.”  That’s a message of restoration for the people of God.

A message of restoration, delivered out in the wilderness. That is a pretty interesting juxtaposition of ideas there — restoration and wilderness. What do New Yorkers think of when we hear the word WILDERNESS? Maybe the Adirondack State Park? Rolling mountains, trees, lakes, wildlife, brushy undergrowth, beautiful colors in autumn. You can hike — or stroll — on trails, paddle a canoe, go horseback riding, and swim. There are places for rustic tent-camping, and even fancy “Adirondack camps” for those of us who require a door and a floor and indoor plumbing. Our wilderness is lush and beautiful and full of life. It’s a place to get away from the rush of real life, for quiet reflection, and relaxation.

But Mark’s Middle Eastern context of wilderness?  That wilderness is so different from our wilderness. This particular area in Mark’s narrative is thought to be between the Dead Sea and the Sinai Peninsula, which is what we know as the western Israel/eastern Egypt area. The Dead Sea is so salty nothing can survive in it, and the Sinai Peninsula and surrounding areas are basically a desert: hot, dry, sandy, prickly vegetation, that’s full of snakes, scorpions, bugs.  That’s a great big NO THANK YOU from me.

There are some of us who have experienced the wilderness of Mark’s Middle East firsthand, but even if we haven’t traveled abroad, there is something recognizable about the idea of wilderness. It’s empty. Uncomfortable. Challenging. Desolate. Alone.  So why does God use the wilderness?

We know that in the Old Testament, God used the wilderness the same way some of us have utilized “The Corner” — as a place for time out. Take the Israelites, marching to the Promised Land. They could not get their act together, and did everything from whining incessantly to building a golden calf. And finally, when they were so close to entering the Promised Land they could just about taste that milk and honey, they couldn’t get past their unbelief.  The wouldn’t trust God to continue to provide for them. God responded by giving them a forty year time out in the desert. What a merciful, kind God to be patient for such a long time before sending the Israelites to time out. I don’t know about you, but I’d have lasted for maybe five minutes with thousands of people whining before I turned that car around.

Not to spoil the end of Mark’s gospel, but Jesus fulfilled all of the prophetic scripture, and his death and resurrection restored the relationship between us and God, so God doesn’t really send people to time out any more. But. God doesn’t prevent us from going to the wilderness, either, because there are three really amazing things that can happen to us in the wilderness: revolution, revelation, and restoration.

Revolution

Wilderness is a place where people are tempted and tested. In the verses that follow today’s scripture, Mark introduces Jesus, and tells the story of Jesus’ baptism, and how a voice from heaven declared Jesus the Son, the Beloved. Right after that, the Holy Spirit drives Jesus out into the wilderness for forty days of temptation and testing. Times of hardship are wilderness experiences, too. We face conflict, struggle, and sickness on a personal level, and on even larger levels. Just this week we have seen fighting over the tax code and legislation, lawsuits about wedding cakes and discrimination, the official recognition of a nation’s capitol that has inflamed a 100 year old conflict. All of those are tests and are rife with temptation.

Revolution begins with conflict. Whether we see the conflict approaching, or whether we wake up one morning and discover that we are embedded in a campaign of shock and awe, we know that revolution is part of life. Sometimes it is sudden, and sometimes it’s so slow it seems more like evolution, but ultimately this kind of test delivers change.

It’s probably a good thing that revolution happens in the wilderness, because the wilderness is big enough for both the revolution and for our response. We can stomp our feet all we want, there aren’t any doors to slam, and if we throw rocks nobody will get hurt. We can shout and carry on and tell God how we really feel about the big, dumb, painful test. Wilderness gives us space to ask, “But why?” and space to listen to the silence when the answer doesn’t come as quickly as we hope it would.

Revelation

Wilderness is a place of revelation. Wilderness is a space created by God for us to experience meditative solitude, growth, and one-on-one interaction with God. We don’t need to create space for growth when we are in the wilderness; wilderness is full of space. It is overflowing with space. Growth happens in the wilderness.

Christians began forming monastaries in the third century. By the fifth century, there was a movement in the monastic community, where monks would journey out into the desert in an effort to intentionally cultivate an awareness of God’s presence, and to experience God in each moment of the day. This group became known as the Desert Fathers and Mothers. The Desert Fathers and Mothers lived plain and simple lives, away from the rush of the world. They intentionally stepped back and detached from worldly desires, clarified their minds, and reordered their priorities so they

were able to focus on God in every moment.

The Desert Fathers and Mothers created a desert of the spirit, in the actual desert, where they could be fully present in the face of silence, waiting, and temptation, where they could wait for revelation. A revelation demands a response, and to respond to it means some kind of inner revolution. Revelation involves being made over, made new, being born again. In the wilderness we wait, we weep, and we learn to live.”

Restoration

And finally, the result of revolution and revelation in the wilderness is restoration. As we journey through testing and temptation, through conflict and change, we arrive at a place of restoration. Restor

ation doesn’t look like a spit-shined version of ourselves before we went to the wilderness. God doesn’t spend all that time and effort with us in the wilderness to deposit us back where we were before the test or before the conflict. God’s restoration takes us beyond who and where we were. Restoration makes us better; in the vast space of the wilderness, we can draw close to God, and emerge from the wilderness at the next level.

But why wilderness? Why are we talking about wilderness in the middle of Advent? The wilderness is a place of deep spiritual encounter. Advent is a time for creating space for a deep spiritual encounter. We are making room for Jesus to be in our lives. We are waiting to hear about the good news of Jesus Christ, the Messiah, the beloved Son of God. The good news is that when Jesus was born, all the promises God made in the Old Testament became reality. The good news is that Jesus taught us about love; he taught us about doing all the good you can, by all the means you can, in all the ways you can, in all the places you can, at all the times you can, to all the people you can, as long as ever you can. We like to credit John Wesley for that, but I’m pretty sure he got it from Jesus. 

Friends, the good news is that even when we are deep in the wilderness, God is there, too, holding us while we storm through revolution.  God is with us, whispering truth while we wait for revelation. And God is there, arms open wide, to celebrate our restoration.

Thanks be to God. Amen.

it’s another banner day in washington

Today, the House of Representatives pushed a shiny, new healthcare bill on through to the Senate. No hearings, little analysis. This bill has been called “a monstrous act of cruelty,” and has been denounced by pretty much every medical-related field except big pharma.

The list of pre-existing conditions includes CRIMES.

Rape is a CRIME.

Sexual assault is a CRIME.

Domestic violence is a CRIME.

And instead of offering embrace and support, victims can now be penalized for seeking medical attention for those three crimes against them. All this happened while the President of the United States made statements saying that women want to be sexually assaulted, and abusers in the entertainment industry were awarded Oscars and given multi-million dollar severance packages.

AND DO NOT GET ME STARTED ON THE JOHNSON AMENDMENT.

What today’s executive order accomplished is to make it legal for churches to tell their congregations which way God wants them to vote. Nobody’s First Amendment rights were violated by the Johnson Amendment. No pastor has been sanctioned for looking at sociopolitical current events through the lens of the Bible. No priest has been reprimanded for asking, “What would Jesus do about _______?” No pastor has been fired for preaching about how the church should interact with refugees or the poor, or about issues of race and gender.

But.

Now no pastor’s tax status will be on the line for preaching the Gospel of Trump. No church will lose its 501(c)3 status for bowing to the idol of America. No house of worship will be in hot water teaching the Doctrine of American Exceptionalism.

Because that’s why we have church, right? To hear about how great the government is, and to have someone tell us what is God’s perspective on our political climate. It’s too much work to look at the critique of government provided throughout the Bible, and compare those situations to what we face today. And besides, Revelation is so dramatic and confusing and HARD.

*****

I took Introduction to Preaching this semester, and Tuesday was my turn in the pulpit. I preached from Jeremiah about prophets, and about the responsibility we have to speak truth to power.

Here’s some truth:

This administration does not care about its constituents. It does not care about women; it does not care about children. This administration does not care about the disabled or the people suffering from mental illness. It does not care for our elders. It does not care about the land, the water, or the air. It does not take seriously nuclear war, nor does it care about the blood already on its hands. It does not care about the poor or the oppressed.

Lifting the Johnson Amendment might accomplish one of the to-do items on the Republican Evangelical’s to-do list. But more importantly, it built a pulpit that allows the rest of us to call them out.

Thanks for holding the door open for us, Mr. President.

*****

Jeremiah 5: 26-29

“My people are infiltrated by wicked men,
    unscrupulous men on the hunt.
They set traps for the unsuspecting.
    Their victims are innocent men and women.
Their houses are stuffed with ill-gotten gain,
    like a hunter’s bag full of birds.
Pretentious and powerful and rich,
    hugely obese, oily with rolls of fat.
Worse, they have no conscience.
    Right and wrong mean nothing to them.
They stand for nothing, stand up for no one,
    throw orphans to the wolves, exploit the poor.
Do you think I’ll stand by and do nothing about this?”

debacle

I turned the television to watch the election results at about 8:30 p.m. We are in the Eastern time zone, and I was looking forward to watching Hillary Clinton be declared president. An hour later, my gut told me the election was going the other way, and by 10:00, I knew the results were not going to turn out how I expected.

I thought about the people I know. I live in an extremely red town, in a red county, in a red section of a blue state. I thought about how excited many of my neighbors must be; I thought about the people I love who are not straight and white and Christian. My friends whose marriages may come under attack from a White House where the second in command believes in one-man-one-woman marriage, and advocates for electroshock therapy and conversion therapy to fix the gays. I thought about all the teenagers and twenty-somethings I know who are discovering that who they are is quite different from what their parents believe is good and correct. I thought about the Native people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline, and the sacrifices they are making on a daily basis. I thought about Ana and the rest of the Buffalo 25, who were arrested in an ICE raid in October.

Wednesday morning I woke up, and saw a message from the parent of a Black son who was assaulted on the school bus by other children, because he was Black and because he was not born in this country. Nobody helped. Nobody stood up for this child. All day long, more and more reports of racist-fueled attacks came out via social media. A colleague of mine got a phone call from their children at school, asking to please be picked up because they were being harassed for their family’s politics. I could link every word in this blog post to separate incidents of hate-fueled crime and not run out of examples.

Last weekend I read that 66% of white women voted for Donald Trump. Sixty-six percent of white women think it is better to have a president who speaks with disdain and disrespect about women, and brags about sexually assaulting women, than it is to have a woman president. I don’t understand this, but as the days slip by I realize that the things I don’t understand are many, and that nothing is every only white or only black. I wonder if what we consider to be white is really a million different shades of grey. Or is it an asymptote? Is the path of things just a curved particularity that get closer and closer to its definition, but never quite gets all the way there, even after it exceeds infinity?

Or are things exactly the opposite? Do they begin near their definition, and then follow a trajectory up and out and away, always recreating, doubling down, becoming caricatures of what they originally were?

Two years ago, our President-Elect tweeted, “Are you allowed to impeach a president for gross incompetence?” and now he is the president, and his list of cabinet appointees is a swamp of incompetence. The latest, education secretary Betsy DeVos, has never taught, has no personal experience with public education, and appears to be a Ken Ham-level science denier. But she’s rich and white and Christian, and has fulfilled the Trump Trifecta.

“Just wait! It will work out! Everything will be fine!” Yes. Everything will be fine for the people who are CHRISTIAN, WEALTHY, and WHITE. If you meet the criteria, you could plug your nose and bury your head in the sand and completely ignore the storm that is brewing in Manhattan. You could come up for air right before the next election.

But hear this. The president-elect is already placing limits on freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and freedom of religion, and he’s not even in office yet. He’s going to make America great again by making sure nobody is around to report on his daily activities, by doubling down on the militarization of police, by closing the gap between Church and State, and by trimming the Bill of Rights. Oh, and so what if it costs a million dollars a day for his wife and child to live in Manhattan from now until June? And so what if he is making money by being the landlord to the Secret Service members who are protecting his family? And so what if he is part owner of the Dakota Access Pipeline, and has a vested interest in completing that project?

So no, I’m not going to get over this. And neither is America.

a confessional lament

Another assignment from my Psalms class.

Oh, Lord, my God
I approach your throne with a heavy heart and tears on my cheeks
You are the protector of the land, you love the people you created.

I repent for my ancestors, who stepped off the Mayflower on to Wampanoag land.
I weep that while they explored, they desecrated a burial ground;
they stole corn buried safely for spring planting.
They extended a hand of smallpox instead of a gesture of peace.

My ancestors took the land, reviled the sacred, and polluted creation.
Greed, and war, and rape, and torture became the standard,
and slowly genocide was enacted.
I am ashamed that my ancestors created reservations.

My people stole their children, discredited their spirituality.
We enforced their poverty, we spend millions of dollars with businesses who
make their living by exploiting caricature,
Exploiting their culture because we are addicted to colonization and power.

And now they rise, and they stand in prayer and we beat them with clubs.
We burn their eyes with gas and spray and force them into kennels.
we shoot them with guns that leave them alive and traumatized.
I repent for my ancestors. I cannot scrub colonizer privilege from my skin.

Creator, they are oppressed, and yet they remain peaceful,
and yet we beat them back, and yet they remain.
Protect the ones who would protect your work.
Protect the ones who love the land you made,
The ones who are your true children, who honor you by honoring your creation.

You have punished armies, ended conflicts.
You take power from oppressors; you restore the oppressed.
You heal the brokenhearted; you set prisoners free.
You bring suffering to those who do not love;
Lord God, make us pay for we know exactly what we do.

the church loves refugees now

My heart is broken for Syria. I have been closely following the civil war since before it was a war, back in 2011 when peaceful protesters gathered to declare their desires for a better, less-oppressive Syria.

In 2013 I had the opportunity to travel to Lebanon and spend time photographing refugee life in some of the informal tented settlements.

home

no one leaves home
unless home is the mouth of a shark
you only run for the border
when you see the whole city running as well*

The next two generations of Syrian leaders are homeless. Two years ago, it was estimated that more than half the population of Syria was internally displaced. More than 11 million people are homeless inside the borders of Syria.

And that is only a guess.

DSC09421

This sweet babe was born in a refugee camp in Lebanon. He is not entitled to a Lebanese birth certificate, and his mama can’t afford to return to Syria to get a birth certificate because they live in abject poverty. It is likely that he will live his entire life as a refugee: lacking food, adequate shelter, and suffering chronic health ailments related to a lack of clean water.

The Syrian Crisis did not materialize one day last week. Aylan, the precious baby found face-down on a Turkish beach, was not the first Syrian baby to drown in the Mediterranean Sea. Hundreds of Syrians have drowned escaping the war, but Aylan was the first one that people chose to see. Hundreds of thousands of Syrians have died in the war –many of them children– but none of those images or stories grabbed the Church’s heartstrings.

The Western Church is, at long last, appropriately horrified by the situation facing the Syrian people. Christians on social media are hashtagging their indignation: #BeTheChurch and #WeWelcomeRefugees are everywhere. There are petitions asking governments to resettle refugees. Much-needed money and supplies are pouring in, and that is truly a benefit that will make people’s lives better.

Why now? Why did the Church decide to “Be The Church” on a random day in August? What made that day more significant than any of the other previous 1,640-ish days since the Syrian Crisis began? Cute babies die daily in Syria. I’m not trying to be crass or to downplay the significance of those deaths; it breaks my heart that people can cause such damage to one another.

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But where have you been, Church? Where have you been for the Palestinians? Where are you for the Afghans? For Iraqis, Somalis, Congolese, Myanmarese, Colombians, or Sudanese? Because from where I stand, it looks like you aren’t here for any of these, or as Jesus called them “the least of these.”

The least of these are mostly confined to their own countries, mostly out of sight, and definitely not affecting the West or Western culture in any way. But those Syrians… they have come to Europe. There are white people carrying the bodies of their dead away in front of white media, and white people are shocked. White people are sweeping in to take care of the poor people of color, white people making decisions, white people saving.

Is the Church really interested in being the Church, in being a servant to the hurting people of the world, in housing the homeless and feeding the hungry? This newfound passion has taken the Church by storm. It looks like a fad, like Christians have discovered the next cool thing to be on fire for, that will soon be forgotten. When was the last time you heard a Christian mention any of the girls kidnapped by Boko Haram in Nigeria? Did you know that Boko Haram is still kidnapping and murdering people? Remember when all of the truly devout Christians in America changed their social media avatars to the Arabic letter that is the first letter of the Arabic word for Christian, to honor all the Christians in Mosul, Iraq who were being massacred? It was so important!

This movement to provide for the Syrian refugees is not an organically-grown movement. It is a public relations campaign that catapulted itself into existence off the body of a dead baby. It is a campaign of shock and awe– shock at the realization of the masses that babies are dying horrible deaths, and awe at the incredible spending power of Western Christianity. I do not see the “We Welcome Refugees” people coming alongside the servants who have been working to assist the Syrian refugees for the past four and a half years. I don’t see this new force even granting the benefit of a mention to the countless NGOs who started the movement to support Syrian refugees. The Church is once again using its financial power to control the lives of the less fortunate, and is steamrolling those who actually have been “being the Church.”

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“Be The Church” is giving Christians a quick and easy means to feeling good about themselves, but it lacks the relational component that is necessary to keep the short attention span of the West focused on people who don’t look or dress like them. The Western Church will show us what it means to be the church: it will burn hot and fiery for a short period of time, and then it will find something else with which to entertain itself.

The Syrian Crisis is going to continue to be a crisis in October. It is going to be a crisis in 2016. It will still be a crisis in 2026, and for decades after. This isn’t a problem the Church can fix. It is one of the most complex social issues facing the world today, and it is one that will outlive my children, and possibly my grandchildren. If the Western Church is going to have any lasting effect on the lives of refugees, it needs to ditch its Saviour complex and learn from the people who have been battling this crisis since the beginning.

*excerpt from the poem “Home” by Warsan Shire,
you can find the entire poem here.

 

 

that speech in congress today.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu addressed Congress this morning. This was a very controversial appearance, because instead of receiving an invitation from his political equivalent (the President) as is customary,  Prime Minister Netanyahu was invited by House Speaker John Boehner. Boehner effectively ignored the chain of command, while at the same time ignoring the practice of not permitting foreign heads of state or foreign political candidates to speak in the United States immediately prior to an election. This avoids the appearance of an endorsement of a foreign candidate, and keeps the United States from openly influencing election results.

Netanyahu was trailing in the polls when he left Israel. His former chief of staff was interviewed following the speech (you can read the whole speech here), and said that many were eagerly anticipating the results of his speech, because they knew speaking in America to an enthusiastic crowd would drastically boost Netanyahu’s standing in the election. The Washington Post claims that more than 80% of Israeli voters are expected to view Netanyahu more positively because of his performance today.

Netanyahu was aware that his visit was in violation of American policy, that the President was not in favour of the visit, and that many people in this country– almost 50% of registered voters— disagree with how this whole thing went down. Sixty members of Congress refused to attend the speech, which caused every referee to exhaust their supplies of political red cards given for bipartisan behaviour. I have to give the Prime Minister a political BS red card, too, for his opening statement:

I want to thank you all for being here today. I know that my speech has been the subject of much controversy. I deeply regret that some perceive my being here as political. That was never my intention.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions, Sir. Or, in this case, the road to continued conflict and nuclear war is paved with “good’ intentions.

The speech was political. The talks between Iran and the United States are very complicated, and that the leader of Iran’s mortal enemy was allowed to stand before the US government and offer a scathing report of Iran’s ambitions in the Middle East, was quite possibly counterproductive to diplomatic efforts. Further, Netanyahu’s comments will not change the position of the United States, but likely will deepen the rift between Iran and Israel.

The timing of the speech was a last-ditch effort to influence voters by Netanyahu; hopefully the Israeli voters are wiser than he believes them to be.

It’s going to take more than polarizing speeches to have an effect on Middle East politics and national relations. The rhetoric only serves to deepen the conflicts and strengthen the foundation of fear and hate on which Middle Eastern politics is built.

seeking justice

Two men were executed yesterday; neither death brought closure or justice or made anything better.  It is a sad time for our country when lives are thrown away, and the very throwing away is cheered and casually joked about.   Murdering a murderer is just as wrong as murdering an innocent man.  

Wash yourselves; make yourselves clean; remove the evil of your deeds from before my eyes; cease to do evil, learn to do good; seek justice, correct oppression; bring justice to the fatherless, plead the widow’s cause.  ~Isaiah 1:16-17, English Standard Version

some items for your consideration

1. New Sewing Machine. I love her. A whole freaking lot. Her name is Nina Bernina.

2. Another Busted Disc. This time, it’s mine. Same one The Mister had surgery on. Some people wear matching shirts or share a hobby, but not us! We get matching boo-boos.

3. Narcotics. See item #2.

4. There is a super nice New York State Park near our house, and we got a season pass, so we go to the beach a whole lot. Last week, one of the lifeguards had to rescue a little boy. I was frightening and awesome at the same time, and I have never seen anybody move as fast as that guard did. Major thumbs up to the New York State Parks for hiring good people, training them well, and for keeping the parks open when many other states are not.

5. Fowl. We own ducks. And I’m sure this statement is going to result in more effbook mockery from that one guy who mocks us for having chickens and thinking about other unconventional pets, but whatever.

6. New Babies And Pregnancies. Four darling babies were born this month, and in the past two days I have learned that two of my friends will be having babies next spring. And before you get all crazy and start suggesting that we make us another wee Dayton, let me remind you that the likelihood that I even get to have a practice run at baby making is… Well… Dude just had surgery and My back is messed and there ain’t gonna be no getting some ’round these parts.

7. Swimming Lessons. My town has a wonderful summer rec program with sports and crafty things and swimming lessons for the short people. On Wednesday, the woman who runs the pool approached me and said that more thN six people had complained to her the previous day because I had breastfed Elliott while the other kids were having their lesson. She handled the situation beautifully, and told the complainers that in NY, women have the right to breastfeed their children anywhere they want, and that she wasn’t going to ask me to stop or to leave. How awesome is that? It’s so rare to hear a story about breastfeeding in public where people know the law and do the right thing. And as an added bonus, I met a lovely mama who is just finishing her Lactation Consultant training. Super cool.

conflicted

I was watching the news tonight, as I’m sure many of you were, waiting to hear President Obama declare Osama bin Laden’s death.  I listened to the diplomatic analysis, the future safety of Americans analysis, the what-the-Pakistanis-think analysis, and I was surprised that I didn’t feel a little more excited.  
Because really, bin Laden was a murderous bastard and shouldn’t I be glad, at least a little bit, that he is dead?  
Miss O came downstairs, because nothing says “I don’t respect your boundaries for bedtime” like nineteen trips down the stairs to fetch nineteen different things, but I digress.  She wrinkled her nose and asked what was on the television. 
There was a terrorist, a man who crashed four airplanes into buildings, because he wanted to hurt people…
Mom, I know what a terrorist is.
It was kind of like a punch in the stomach.  I know my short people are superty smart, and I shouldn’t be surprised that she knows what a terrorist is.  We don’t watch the news, we don’t discuss war or murderous bastards or related subjects.  I try to keep that stuff off my people’s radars.  (People’s radar??? Where are the grammar police when I need them!)
We talked about the events of 11 September, 2001; I told her about the planes and the people who died.  I told her about the heroic efforts of the passengers of Flight 93 who prevented more death and destruction by giving their own lives.  I told her that bin Laden was proud of what he had orchestrated that day, and that he boldly took ownership of the carnage.
He pretty much had it coming, huh, mama?
Yep, kid, he sure did.
And yet I wonder: does anybody really feel better now that he’s dead?  Or are victims’ families going to wake up tomorrow and find that the news of his death leaves them with an odd sort of emptiness?  Their loved ones are still dead.  Al Qaeda is still there; al Quaeda still hates everybody.  
There is no safety that comes from this murder, justified as it may have been, and I say may have been justified because in my deepest spirit, I am not entirely sure where I stand on the issue.  My instincts hate that we kill people.  I hate the execution in the same way I hate the reason for the execution, and I cannot compare the costs of either.
My kid knows about terrorists.  I hate that most of all.